GREVILLEAS

In the previous post, my Magnolia photos were right next to some Grevillea images in my Photo Library.

I don’t think I’ve seen any of these Australian evergreen plants in my western suburb, but I do have some lovely shots of them from past home locations.

Grevillias are a diverse and variable range of Australian plants, from large, upright trees to scrambling ground covers.  The majority are medium shrubs with flowers resembling spiders and often appear in long toothbrush-like clusters.

Here’s the 4 images (below).  They were found in a small island of native plants in the middle of a suburban road.   They were such a surprising sight and were no doubt planted by an environmentally aware local council.

They attract birds in great numbers, but I imagine they’d be too big to grow in a pot on my balcony????

COAST BANKSIA (Banksia integrifolia)

 

Wikipedia had the following information which I found far more descriptive than my 2 plant encyclopaedias…………..

Banksia, commonly known as Australian honeysuckles, are a genus of around 170 species. These Australian Wildflowers and popular garden plants are easily recognised by their characteristic flower spikes and fruiting “cones” and heads. Banksias range in size from prostrate woody shrubs to trees up to 30 metres tall. They are found in a wide variety of landscapes; sclerophyll forest, (occasionally) rainforest, shrubland, and some more arid landscapes, though not in Australia’s deserts.

Heavy producers of nectar, banksias are a vital part of the food chain in the Australian bush. They are an important food source for all sorts of nectarivorous animals, including birds, bats, rats, possums, stingless bees and a host of invertebrates. Furthermore, they are of economic importance to Australia’s nursery and cut flower industries. However these plants are threatened by a number of processes including land clearing, frequent burning and disease, and a number of species are rare and endangered.

ROUND-LEAF or FAIRY FANFLOWER? (Scaevola)

Not sure whether this unusual flower is a ROUND-LEAF FANFLOWER  or a FAIRY FANFLOWER, but I do know it’s genus is Scaevola.  I just hate it when my encyclopaedias and the internet have conflicting information as I’m just an amateur when it comes to gardening and don’t have the time, or inclination, to spend hours trying to work out what is right, what is wrong OR even……..whether its just a flower/plant with various Common Names.

If I had a real in-ground garden, instead of 12-15 potted plants on a tiled balcony, this is one plant I’d grow.  Gosh, I could even grow it now (in a container), but at the moment, I grow mainly Herbs and a few leafy green vegetables (plus a couple of long-flowering plants).  After last summer’s highly successful tomato crop on my west-facing balcony, next Spring I might even try some other sun-loving vegetables that can be successfully grown in containers, but I do prefer the quicker yielding leafy crops.

I love blue or purple/blue flowers and this became a favourite after I made the first photos some years ago.

Scaevolas are fan-shaped Australian flowers in shades of purple-blue, lilac or blue and I love the profusion of blooms that cascade over the waist-high rockery area near The Plant Cottage in the north-west corner of the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne  

They’re great ground-covers and really do look pretty.