APOSTLEBIRD (Struthidea cinerea)

When I cleared out my whole nature blog and started afresh, my main aim was to set up a better index in the sidebar for both birds and plants (as well as the intermittent news on my apartment balcony garden), but inevitably I’ll also end up with the more dull and less interesting Australian birds.

This Apostlebird (Struthidea cinerea), photographed in Melbourne Zoo’s great aviary, is one of them.

APOSTLEBIRD (Struthidea cinerea) – The Great Aviary, Melbourne Zoo.

The best way to describe this bird, usually found in more inner regions of eastern Australia, is DULL.

Body dull, lead-grey with a darker eye patch and dark brown wings.  Tail long and black, wedge-shaped.  Beak, dark grey, robust and almost triangular.  Legs short, giving an awkward almost horizontal posture, with the tip of its long tail on the ground.

It flies low, with frequent glides.  When feeding it hops, walks and runs actively and is often aggressive.

Not usually seen as far south as Melbourne where I live, but to be honest, I don’t think I could identify it in flight in the wild anyway, as its so similar to many other dark-coloured Australian birds, so was pleased to photograph it standing on a nearby branch at the Zoo.

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MUTE SWAN (Cygnus olor)

This white swan is huge and distinctive and you can never miss it on the rare times you might see one in Australia.  It’s an introduced bird and now quite scarce, being only found in the wild in the vicinity of Perth in Western Australia.  Various people say they’ve seen them in public gardens, or lakes, in my state of Victoria, but I’ll bet they’ve been captured elsewhere and let free in the vicinity, not really a wild bird.

I photographed this lovely specimen swimming around the pond in The Japanese Garden at Melbourne Zoo and found it quite challenging to get some definition in those white feathers which appeared overexposed in the bright sunlight, so had to tweak the mid-tones back and forth in post processing (which I rarely do much of).

They’re normally silent, but do occasionally hiss or grunt – can’t say I’ve ever heard them utter a sound.

 

 

CATTLE EGRET (Ardea ibis)

The Cattle Egret (Ardea ibis)  is large compared to other native birds, but is actually the smallest of the Egrets, and unmistakable in its breeding plumage with long yellow or ginger plumes on its head, neck , back and throat.

It’s frequently found feeding among grazing animals which is probably where the name came from (I presume).

The breeding adult is white, often rather scruffy, with yellowish beak and legs.  Cattle Egrets are found in most coastal regions of Australia, not necessarily close to water, although it breeds in trees over water.

These photos were made in Melbourne Zoo’s Great Aviary and the images below gives you some idea of how large this space is.

While Melbourne Zoo, located to the north of the city and easily accessible via tram from William Street, is open 365 days of the year, there is the odd occasion when the Aviary is closed for maintenance, so if you’re visiting to specifically visit the Great Aviary, it might be worth a phone call before you leave home/hotel.

Another hint: Don’t go during the school holidays in Melbourne, as young children have a habit of running down the boardwalk and squealing excitedly, which kind of…… spoils the experience a wee bit…..well it does for me.   Not that I have anything against young children enjoying themselves, but I really do think, for the enjoyment of other visitors, parents might try to discourage loud boisterous behaviour in this particular area.  There are signs at the Aviary entrance requesting that children don’t run anyway.

I could easily spend 2 hours in the Great Aviary and have done so many, many times over the years.

GREVILLEA ‘MOONLIGHT’

GREVILLEA is a diverse genus of about 360 species of evergreen flowering plants, native to rainforest and more open habitats in Australia.  I believe this variety, which I photographed at Melbourne Zoo, is called GREVILLEA ‘Moonlight’ and is one of the most popular (as it flowers all year round).  The flower is gorgeous and very attractive to birds, honeyeaters in particular.

I managed to capture a LITTLE WATTLEBIRD (Anthochaera chrysoptera), a large, slim, rather dull Honeyeater, on one of the Zoo bushes, not far from the back entrance/exit.

GREVILLEA ‘Moonlight’ is tough and adaptable and great as a feature plant, but also makes an effective informal screen or hedge.