KOALA – Southern – (Phascolarctos cinerus victor)

Found this wonderful collection of Koalas on YouTube and it was sooooooo cute, I thought I’d share.

It’s enough to put a smile on anyone’s face during this rather gloomy time around the world.

Here’s one of my own collection of Koala images from Melbourne Zoo

# A PHOTO A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY – Day 41

From the archives

17th May 2012

Continuing on the theme of posting a photo a day from my archives while the lockdown is in place.

AUSTRALIAN SHELDUCK (Tadorna radjah)

I fell asleep earlier this afternoon and slept the afternoon away so didn’t have time to review and/or process the photos from yesterday’s short walk.

# A PHOTO A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY – Day 38

From the archives

These images were made over several trips to Melbourne Zoo and just struck me as being worthy of a WordPress post.

These are Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) and are found in the eastern third of Australia.   They can weigh 66kg and grow to 6’6″ when standing upright.   In other words, you don’t want to mess around with a kangaroo.   Actually, the Red Kangaroo found in arid Australia is larger and can weigh up to 90kg.

Here’s an extract from Wikipedia.

The eastern grey kangaroo is the second largest and heaviest living marsupial and native land mammal in Australia. An adult male will commonly weigh around 50 to 66 kg (110 to 146 lb) whereas females commonly weigh around 17 to 40 kg (37 to 88 lb). They have a powerful tail that is over 1 m long in adult males.[4] Large males of this species are more heavily built and muscled than the lankier red kangaroo and can occasionally exceed normal dimensions. One of these, shot in eastern Tasmania weighed 82 kg (181 lb), with a 2.64 m (8.7 ft) total length from nose to tail (possibly along the curves). The largest known specimen, examined by Lydekker, had a weight of 91 kg (201 lb) and measured 2.92 m (9.6 ft) along the curves. When the skin of this specimen was measured it had a “flat” length of 2.49 m (8.2 ft).[5]

  1.  “Are you still in there Little Joey?”  (a joey is a baby kangaroo).

2.  Check out the joey popping its head out of its Mother’s pouch on the left.

3.  The image below reminds me of a human sprawling out and relaxing.

4.  You might think the kangaroos are having a bit of a cuddle in the image below, but actually, this shot was the start of a fight.  I seem to have lost the rest of the series made on this visit to the zoo in the computer crash last year.  Kangaroos actually have ‘boxing matches’.

5.   I included this shot as it shows how large (and strong) their tails are.

……and some images from my brother’s farm (10 acres).   There are some better shots but they don’t seem to be filed in the Kangaroo Folder so not sure where they are.

CAIRNS BIRDWING BUTTERFLY (Ornithoptera euphorion)

Now I’m into reviewing 2012 (and have given the rest of 2011 a miss) in my archives, there is a bit more variety in photography subjects.

I’d gone to Melbourne Zoo on 21 February 2012 (having already to take out a membership on an earlier visit).  Entry for a pensioner as I was, meant paying the concession rate of about $19(?) a visit back in those days.   Membership per annum was about $70+ for all 3 of Melbourne’s zoos, so it would only take 3-4 visits a year to make membership worth the money.   If you’re a tourist visiting Melbourne and planning on seeing all 3 zoos (which includes Healesville Sanctuary in the country and Werribee Park Open Range Zoo in the western suburbs) and have children, defintely take out a year’s membership.  It’s much cheaper than visiting all 3 zoos on a day pass.

As it turned out, I had so much fun photographing the animals, birds, insects and reptiles, I ended up visiting over 100 times over 3 years – (I counted the dates of each photo folder to work that total out).

Furthermore, the beautiful Temperate Rainforest landscaping was so cool and refreshing, I would often go 3 times in the one week mid-Summer.   I guess the enormous Great Aviary really confirmed my newly found love of Bird Photography also.

This main zoo in North Melbourne is small enough to cover in one day, but large enough to make all the newer enclosures, including the walk through ones, interesting.

The Butterfly House with its humid artificially controlled atmosphere became the first port of call when I entered via the large entrance on the main road.  The back entrance/exit was used from then on as it had a tram stop (& train stop) close to the gate.

CAIRNS BIRDWING (Ornithoptera euphorion)
MAINTENANCE DAY THIS DAY WHEN ALL THE BUTTERFLIES WERE ABSENT THAT I COULD SEE. HOW DID THEY REMOVE THEM ALL IS THE BIG QUESTION.
THIS DAY MIGHT HAVE BEEN DURING THE SCHOOL HOLIDAYS AS IT WAS QUITE CROWDED AND HARDER TO PHOTOGRAPH THE DIFFERENT SPECIES.

 

# A PHOTO A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY – Day 10

Couldn’t resist uploading this one today

From the archives

28th April 2012

YOU’RE BORED? TRY DRINKING THROUGH A STRAW WITH YOUR FINGER ON THE OTHER END (from the Melbourne Zoo animal folder)

Canon EOS 500D (2009 model)

Lens – not sure, but think it was 18-200mm

ISO 1600  (yes, it was a very dark area)

f/5.6

1/160s

 

 

NANKEEN NIGHT HERON (Nycticorax caledonicus)

The first time I saw a Nankeen Night Heron (Nycticorax caledonicus) on the bank of the Ornamental Lake in the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne, I nearly passed out with excitement.

NANKEEN NIGHT HERON photographed from my special secret hiding place down a rarely used path in the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne.

I’d never seen one before.

A juvenile NANKEEN NIGHT HERON – Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne

I thought I was looking at a very rare bird, but of course I later saw it was very common in the RBG, Melbourne Zoo and even, my current home location (just haven’t seen it here yet).

Perhaps not very well focused, but this long-distance shot of the dead tree where the NANKEEN NIGHT HERONS bask in the late Winter sun in the Royal Botanic Gardens gives you an idea of how many there were that day.
A further distant shot of the upright part of that dead tree. Sometimes you’d see as many as 25-30 Nankeen Nigh Herons on its upper branches.

It’s a large, but comparatively dumpy, large-headed heron.  It’s beak is large, deep and black.  This heron has yellowish legs.  The plumage is a distinctive dark cinnamon above with dark crown and white drooping crest in breeding season.  The underparts are buff shading to white.

The juvenile is also distinctive with dark brown above and plentiful bold white spots.  (It’s called the Rufous Night Heron on some web sites).

I think it is my favourite bird of all I’ve photographed (since I took up Photography as a hobby in 2010).

I managed to get some great shots up-close in the outdoor restaurant area at Melbourne Zoo’s Japanese Garden entrance.

It even beats my second favourite – the White-faced Heron.

Since I can’t get outdoors for a walk today, despite the superb cool weather  and fluffy white clouds scattered across the vivid blue Summer sky, I decided to share some images from my archives.

Hope you enjoyed them 🙂

BLACK-NECKED STORK (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus)

BLACK-NECKED STORK (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus)

The Black-necked Stork (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus) is huge, often known as Jabiru.

The adult is unmistakable, with white body contrasting black flight feathers, back and tail, and iridescent purplish neck and head.  The black beak is massive.  The legs are long and bright red, although the colour seems to vary in my old photo folder.   Seems to be more of an orange colour, but I suppose that is the Auto White Balance setting I used back in the day I shot these photos.   A couple of the images in this post seem to be on a warmer White Balance Setting (as you’ll notice).

BLACK-NECKED STORK (Ephippiorhynchus asiaticus)

Eyes are dark in the male and yellow in the female.  The immature bird is brown above paling to whitish below, beak and legs grey.  Apparently the voice has deep booms with the beak clappering and to be honest, I can’t remember this sound from my many Zoo visits, (where the images below were made in the enormous Great Aviary).

I’ve never seen it in the wild, with it being found predominantly in the far north, or far north-eastern, areas of Australia.  But in re-booting my nature blog and starting a proper bird index of the 101 (errr……probably more like 110) bird species I’ve photographed in parks, nature reserves, Royal Botanic Gardens and Melbourne Zoo, its forms part of the list.

I think I’m up to about 40 birds I’ve shared and listed in the right-hand column of this page, so there are quite a few more species to share from my archives in future posts.

I found it a little difficult to find a really sharply focused image in my old iPhoto folder this morning, so I’ve uploaded an array of images hoping that some of them will be clear enough to see some of the feather colours and details.

Twice I’ve seen what I presume is a mating display (?) or aggressive display (?) between 2 of these stunning birds, but not being familiar with the movie/video features of my camera didn’t know how to capture it.

It was well worth seeing 🙂