WALLFLOWER (Erysimum)

Wallflowers (Erysimum) are some of the prettiest garden flowers around and the images below, made in The Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne in October 2013, show some of their lovely colour.

The Gardening Australia website says…

Wallflowers have simple, narrow, green to blue-green leaves, and are mainly evergreen. Flower stems, tall in the larger species, appear mainly over spring and summer, and also in winter in mild climates. The heads carry dense clusters of small 4-petalled blooms that are often richly fragrant. The petals are usually yellow but may also be orange, red, or mauve, and the hybrids extend the colour range further.

WALLFLOWER (Erysimum)

Wallflowers are mostly hardy, but they do best in a climate that offers cool summers and mild winters. They should be planted in a sunny open position in moist well-drained soil. Though they can be quite drought tolerant, they will reward with abundant flowers if they are watered regularly – particularly if it is done in conjunction with regular feeding, trimming, and deadheading.

This flower bed was in the back garden of The Plant Craft Cottage 

The Cottage, built in 1850/51 to house one of the Gardeners, is only open at certain times, but visit the website above and check out the images in the Header as they show the wonderful array of crafts that Craft members make.  It’s well worth a visit if you’re either a local or a tourist.  In fact, not many locals know about it.  I often used to buy small gifts or hand-made Christmas Cards there at the Gift shop (manned by volunteers) and we always had wonderful little chats about the area, history and array of craft classes taught at the Cottage.  I thought about joining, but like all things in my life, didn’t want to get up early for classes.

If you like English cottage garden plants, do visit the  The Royal Botanic Gardens Website to find out more.

Now, of course, I live too far away.  In fact, just this week, I received a Public Transport email advising that my 3 bus routes to that side of the city have been partly discontinued.  If I didn’t catch a taxi direct (which is fairly expensive), I’d have to catch 2 buses (or a tram and bus) to the city, and then…………walk down to the main south-bound tram route leading out of the city.  There is no longer a tram going past my favourite RBG entrance either.  I’ll bet the tiny group of shops and cafes near that entrance are well and truly missing the trade.

It’s not that I can’t get there, so much as, these days, I prefer not to waste half my day on public transport and then a long walk to get anywhere.  So easy when I lived and worked next to The Royal Botanic Gardens for over 25 years, but my life has changed now in retirement and after 2 apartment moves.

I like to think of it as ‘not worse‘, as many chronic pain sufferers might, merely ‘different‘.

It’s all in the Mind you see.

A finger points at the moon, but the moon is not at the tip of the finger. Words point at the truth, but the truth is not in words.

——Huineng

 

 

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ARUM LILY (Zantedeschia aethiopica)

At the top of my short steep road is the back entrance to a townhouse and a clump of Arum Lilies.  It’s expanded from its original 3 flowers last year to several this year and was the first photo stop on my short walk yesterday. (note: these plants are considered a pest in Western Australia).

I love the swirling edges of the flower rim and nearly always photograph them with a very shallow DOF (Depth Of Field) or large aperture.  My Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 lens set at about f4.5 gives me the effect I want, but the first image in this post is set at f11 to give a bit more detail.

Sadly, my back pain precludes me from both bending down low and kneeling and twisting these days, so I had to edit the images to increase the mid-tones and give the flowers some more definition.  This threw the colour saturation a bit out-of-whack, but I haven’t the interest or time to spend on photo editing.  I can no longer always do flower photography at angles that I would like, but I know long-time followers understand my limitations.

It certainly doesn’t stop me enjoying my Photography Hobby.

For those interested, I bought this lens about 3 years ago as I could never get quite close enough with my Canon 50mm f1.4 and the Sigma’s 17-50mm gives me that little bit of zoom that covers the gap in the 4 lenses I now own.  If you put the Sigma 17-50mm on a tripod, or can hand-hold your camera very steady, you can almost get a macro, or very close to an insect, which is good enough for me. The Canon lens is extremely sharp and excellent in low light, but the Sigma is not far behind it.

The ‘nifty fifty‘ as the 50mm f/1.4 lens is often called, is rarely taken out of its soft pouch now and I’d sell it, except that they bring so little money second-hand and mine is in perfect condition.  I refuse to sell good lenses for peanuts.

I think the header image on my B & W Blog was made with the ‘nifty fifty’ and I cropped and turned it slightly to give the abstract quality and composition I wanted.

BIRD OF PARADISE (Strelitzia retinae)

I had walked to and from the local medical centre yesterday.

(is it really 1.25am Tuesday morning and I’m still awake 🙂 ).

It only took me 40 minutes to make the 10 minute journey as I had to keep stopping to photograph the gorgeous flowers along the way.  The Cherry blossoms in the nearby tiny park near the local supermarket were the main objective in walking with a painful hip and knee, but the fresh air was so invigorating and the pain slowly receded as I discovered each new Spring bloom.

Despite feeling a little unwell, I decided to walk home again and this short journey took me an hour.  LOL  😀  How can anyone make such a short walk into such a lengthy journey?

Only a photographer of course, although I must admit when I was standing at the highest point of the river valley below me, looking at the city of Melbourne’s office and apartment towers in the far distance, it really was an interesting landscape.

There were many Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia retinae) in front of an apartment block but most were dead or dying, so it took me a while to find a flower worth photographing.  Then with a busy background I stepped back and forth trying to find a neutral background – in the end, a concrete column.

Stelitzia flowers are at their best when just opened and looking very fresh and colourful – the one above was just starting to brown off and wilt.

BLUEBERRY “NELLIE KELLY’ Sunshine Blue (Vaccinyum x corymbusm x ashei x darrowi)

If you learn to enjoy waiting, you don’t have to wait to enjoy.

Kazuaki Tanahashi

I’ve been watching the flowers on my Blueberry bush most days recently as I can’t wait for the flowers to all turn from pink to white.

I was going to go out and wash the windows before these photos, but the sky has gone quite gloomy and overcast and the light dropped a few notches (as though its going to rain), so no point.

“The Nellie Kelly Blueberry (Sunshine Blue) is a delightful, evergreen bush that grows to 1 metre, producing pink flowers during the winter and delectable fruit in late spring and summer. The bush is frost tolerant and needs to be planted in areas where overnight temperatures drop below 5C degrees during winter as this helps to promote the flowers.

Nellie Kelly Blueberries are suitable for either garden beds or large pots where they will get part sun. They will last 10 to 15 years and produce up to 4 kilograms of fruit a season. Blueberries prefer a soil pH of 4.5 to 6, so a well-drained, premium grade, acidic azalea potting mix is ideal. Keep the bush moist and feed with a slow release, acidifying fertiliser during winter and late summer. Prune the bush vigorously after fruiting, removing up to a third of the bush”.

I’ve got Osmocote Azalea fertiliser – wonder if that’ll help?

NOTE: You’ll have noticed I changed the name of my blog to Room With a View – seemed like a logical step since all I do at the moment is look out the window every day.

My excuse is that I was in hospital last week and I’m supposed to be ‘taking it easy’.

What’s your excuse for staring out the window all day?  Boring job? The Weather? Stunning view of the countryside or mountains? Procrastinating about the window cleaning chore?

Or is it purely and simply because you also have……….a Room With a View?

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Captured this Sparrow sneaking a look through the dirty window just now.  Wonder what she’s thinking?

JAPANESE ROSE (Kerria japonica)

 

Japanese Rose (Kerria japonica), the sole species in the genus Kerria, is a deciduous shrub in the rose family Rosacea, native to China, Japan and Korea.

(The scientific genus name is also used as a common name Kerria).

Kerria japonica grows  to 1-3 metres (or 3.3 – 9.8 feet) tall, with weak arching stems.  In the wild it grows in thickets on mountain slopes and the flowers are golden-yellow with 5 petals which appear in Spring.  Best grown in shade to avoid blanching the flowers, this particular bush, I photographed in the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne, was in very deep shade I distinctly remember……..and was one of the double-flowered cultivars and relatively pale.  Just as well the bush had a name plaque in the ground at the base, otherwise I would have mistaken it for an ordinary Rose.

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NOTE: I had to download an app. to print a medical referral from gmail yesterday and along with that app. came some sort of virus/intruder that not only changed all my ‘favourites’ and shortcuts, but a few other weird things.

To LIKE or COMMENT on some of the blogs I follow, I am having to log on to WordPress with my password (again).   So if you don’t see me on your blog for a while, I hope you’ll understand I’m bogged down a wee bit at the moment.

It also allowed a ‘guest user’ to infiltrate.

Fortunately, I checked my Firewall (OK) and Users/Security (not OK) first, which highlighted the intruder almost immediately.   My computer files are a bit of a mess, but I’m slowly beginning to re-sort, reconnect and clear out some of the Trash.

The app. was a common one used to print medical files and as a technology-challenged blogger, I’m totally mystified as to what went wrong.

Today (and tomorrow) are perfect sunny Winter days, so I’m torn between indoor and outdoor tasks.

I think Outdoors might win.

“Make hay while the sun shines” is my motto.  Well, at least take the camera over the other side of the road to photograph that gorgeous Purple Coral Pea up close.