PHOTINIA ROBUSTA (Photinia x fraseri)

The white-flowering small bushes at the top of my steep road are in flower at the moment.

Although I’ve made the occasional photo at their varying stages of growth, it wasn’t until last week that I saw a plant label attached to one of them and was able to identify it.

I know little about common garden plants and have always had to rely on Mr Google images or my 2 Australian Plant Encyclopaedias to identify anything.  I even keep the plant labels of the potted plants I buy for my balcony garden as I forget the Botanical names almost as soon as I plant them.-

Photinia Robusta (Photinia x fraseri) is a spectacular fast growing dense evergreen shrub.

Dark glossy green leaves with brilliant red new growth and clusters of dainty white flowers in Spring make this an attractive hedge plant, and clipping throughout the year will flush on new growth to repeat the bright show of colour. It can be kept clipped to around 1.5 m tall and wide.

They are suitable for a full sun to part shade position, frost tolerant and requires little water once established.

There are about 4 plants in a row in front of a green-painted power junction box (which feeds this housing estate I suppose – I’m guessing).  The 2 images below were made late afternoon with the power box between the sun and the plants, throwing them into deep shade quite early in the afternoon.

I love the glossy red leaves that contrast so vividly with the green.  Even the tight flower buds are attractive in their own way.

Advertisements

ARUM LILY (Zantedeschia aethiopica)

At the top of my short steep road is the back entrance to a townhouse and a clump of Arum Lilies.  It’s expanded from its original 3 flowers last year to several this year and was the first photo stop on my short walk yesterday. (note: these plants are considered a pest in Western Australia).

I love the swirling edges of the flower rim and nearly always photograph them with a very shallow DOF (Depth Of Field) or large aperture.  My Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 lens set at about f4.5 gives me the effect I want, but the first image in this post is set at f11 to give a bit more detail.

Sadly, my back pain precludes me from both bending down low and kneeling and twisting these days, so I had to edit the images to increase the mid-tones and give the flowers some more definition.  This threw the colour saturation a bit out-of-whack, but I haven’t the interest or time to spend on photo editing.  I can no longer always do flower photography at angles that I would like, but I know long-time followers understand my limitations.

It certainly doesn’t stop me enjoying my Photography Hobby.

For those interested, I bought this lens about 3 years ago as I could never get quite close enough with my Canon 50mm f1.4 and the Sigma’s 17-50mm gives me that little bit of zoom that covers the gap in the 4 lenses I now own.  If you put the Sigma 17-50mm on a tripod, or can hand-hold your camera very steady, you can almost get a macro, or very close to an insect, which is good enough for me. The Canon lens is extremely sharp and excellent in low light, but the Sigma is not far behind it.

The ‘nifty fifty‘ as the 50mm f/1.4 lens is often called, is rarely taken out of its soft pouch now and I’d sell it, except that they bring so little money second-hand and mine is in perfect condition.  I refuse to sell good lenses for peanuts.

I think the header image on my B & W Blog was made with the ‘nifty fifty’ and I cropped and turned it slightly to give the abstract quality and composition I wanted.

BLUEBERRY “NELLIE KELLY’ Sunshine Blue (Vaccinyum x corymbusm x ashei x darrowi)

If you learn to enjoy waiting, you don’t have to wait to enjoy.

Kazuaki Tanahashi

I’ve been watching the flowers on my Blueberry bush most days recently as I can’t wait for the flowers to all turn from pink to white.

I was going to go out and wash the windows before these photos, but the sky has gone quite gloomy and overcast and the light dropped a few notches (as though its going to rain), so no point.

“The Nellie Kelly Blueberry (Sunshine Blue) is a delightful, evergreen bush that grows to 1 metre, producing pink flowers during the winter and delectable fruit in late spring and summer. The bush is frost tolerant and needs to be planted in areas where overnight temperatures drop below 5C degrees during winter as this helps to promote the flowers.

Nellie Kelly Blueberries are suitable for either garden beds or large pots where they will get part sun. They will last 10 to 15 years and produce up to 4 kilograms of fruit a season. Blueberries prefer a soil pH of 4.5 to 6, so a well-drained, premium grade, acidic azalea potting mix is ideal. Keep the bush moist and feed with a slow release, acidifying fertiliser during winter and late summer. Prune the bush vigorously after fruiting, removing up to a third of the bush”.

I’ve got Osmocote Azalea fertiliser – wonder if that’ll help?

NOTE: You’ll have noticed I changed the name of my blog to Room With a View – seemed like a logical step since all I do at the moment is look out the window every day.

My excuse is that I was in hospital last week and I’m supposed to be ‘taking it easy’.

What’s your excuse for staring out the window all day?  Boring job? The Weather? Stunning view of the countryside or mountains? Procrastinating about the window cleaning chore?

Or is it purely and simply because you also have……….a Room With a View?

******

Captured this Sparrow sneaking a look through the dirty window just now.  Wonder what she’s thinking?