VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF LIFE – Pink Lillies

My God-daughter brought me some lovely pink lilies when she and her Mother came for lunch on Wednesday.   It was such a thrill to see her as I couldn’t go to her wedding in Spain in May of this year.

The buds were all closed, but with the warmth of the wall heater, they have quickly opened and brought a welcome array of Spring colour into my home.

I started off with my Sigma 17-50mm f2.8 lens on an ISO of 800  which was what I’d been using the day before with the birds on my dark shady balcony.   I did have a bit of trouble getting enough light onto the flowers with a hand-held shot, so the aperture was left on f2.8.

Note: I don’t why this lens exif data keeps showing Canon 17-55mm lens, but it’s definitely a Sigma 17-50mm lens.   I love this lens for getting a little closer to flowers.

Then got out my old Canon 50mm f1.4 lens which I hadn’t used in ages.   I was trying to focus on the stamens and still keep the aperture on f1.4 to get a narrow DOF (Depth of Field).

I don’t know what variety of lily these are and Mr Google images had more than one description of this pink lily so we’ll just call it Pink Lily.

I probably would have done better to put the camera on a tripod and use the remote shutter release cable so I could step back and let more of the light source in but was happy enough with the 2 differing shots.

Enjoy!………

PELARGONIUM ‘Survivor’

 

PELARGONIUM ‘Survivor”

I love photographing dew or raindrops on flowers (or grass).   I always think it adds another dimension to an ordinary flower image.

The Pelargonium in this post is not in flower in my balcony garden at the moment, but it was such a cheerful sight as I looked through my archives this morning (for something to post other than computer problems), I couldn’t resist sharing the image again.

……and for those interested in flower photography, brightly coloured flowers photograph much better early early in the morning, late in the day or on an overcast day.   Slightly under-exposing the image helps too.

CALIFORNIA POPPY (Eschscholzia)

I don’t often put links to other websites on my nature blog, but if you’re a flower lover, you just have to swap over to Anne McKinnell ‘s blog to see her latest post.

My own Californian Poppy images look rather ordinary in comparison (below).

CALIFORNIA POPPY (Eschscholzia)

 

 

COASTAL CUSHION BUSH (Leucophyta brownii)

Found it!

I thought the bush in the previous post looked a bit like one of the Coastal Saltbushes I’d seen down at the Jawbone Coastal Conservation and Nature Reserve and I was right.

I found the name of my mystery local bush with the right words in a search of Google Images late last night.  It’s halfway down the pdf. here

Then of course, I was able to type the correct name into my Google search and read more about it at Victorian Resources online

I thought it looked a very drought-hardy plant even in the flat open windy area near my local river, so looking up Coastal Saltbush wasn’t too far wrong.  It brought me to a Coastal plant website.  In fact, after putting the right words, in the right order, in my Google search I found the name in something like 5 minutes.  Just goes to show how appropriate wording in your search can be vital in identifying local flora and fauna quickly.

I’ve often spent, quite literally years, searching for names and given up, then one day decided to try again with different wording for Mr Google and I’ve come up trumps in 5 minutes.

It’s all very well to bookmark an Australian Plant directory online (OR even look up my own 2 plant encyclopaedias), but narrowing  your plant search  down with carefully chosen words can be a great time saver.

Now I’ve found it, I can name the photo and put together a short post on last Saturday’s walk and bird life.

SCENTED GERANIUM ‘Candy Dancer’ (Pelargonium ‘Candy Dancer’)

This scented Geranium is a small, compact shrub growing approximately 70cm (27 inches) wide and 70cm high.  It’s so easy to grow and has a lovely fragrance and is drought and heat tolerant, so perfect for our Australian climate.

Pelargonium ‘Candy Dancer’

The images in this post come from The Herb Garden in the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne (as you can see from the brick paved path in the background), but I’ve certainly seen it in many residential gardens also.

Pelargonium ‘Candy Dancer’