GRAPE HYACINTH (Muscari armeniacum)

GRAPE HYACINTH (Muscari armeniacum)

I first saw this tiny blue flowering plant on a corner flower bed in a residential garden on my route to my office back in my working life.   (I worked across the road from the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne for the benefit of new followers).  I loved its delicate tiny blue flowers and used to look for it each Spring.

When I bought a camera and took up Photography as a hobby in May 2010 after taking early retirement, it was one of the early flower images I was pleased to capture.

The image above date back to 22nd August 2012 and after reading about it this morning I delayed my offline tasks and decided to share it.

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As an aside, I spent ages over the weekend making a copy of a couple of seascapes and converting that copy to Black & White for my other blog.   I must have spent an hour editing them and creating what looked like a pen & wash type of image.   I also re-edited a whole series of images made down at St Kilda Beach and Boat Marina in July 2012, but after a software update in the last couple of days, they’ve completely disappeared – the copies and the edits.

I did the same for a scene showing a Father and 2 children walking along St Kilda pier.  That is……making a copy of the colour image first and then converting it to Black & White and editing the copy (leaving the original in colour).

Now, the colour version has completely disappeared so I’m left with a B & W version that won’t reset back to colour since the software update.

Actually, none of my B & W images will revert back to colour since I bought a new computer and had the latest software installed last year.   After buying an Apple Mac Pro back in 2012 I used to always be able to revert images or retain editing after software updates.

Has anyone else done an Apple Catalina software update in the last couple of days and found images changed or disappeared?   The photo library which I’ve had trouble with since I bought a new desktop computer and updated to Catalina software in May 2019 drives me crazy anyway.   The worst problem is the images freezing within minutes of opening the library each morning and the only way to resolve it to log off and reboot the computer…….sometimes many times in the one morning.   There is nothing wrong with the rest of my Catalina software.   Only my photo library and ability to edit images.  It’s version 10.15.4

 

# A PHOTO A DAY KEEPS THE DOCTOR AWAY – Day 7

From the archives

3rd March 2011

BLUE BUTTERFLY BUSH (Clerodendrum)

Canon EOS 500D (2009 model)

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 macro lens

ISO 320

f/2.8

1/100s

This is one of the hardest flowers I’ve photographed in the Royal Botanic Gardens.   Once the bush is in full bloom (about 8-10 feet high & wide), it’s almost impossible to isolate just one flower as there are so many flowers on the bush).   And of course, you’re never quite sure exactly which day the buds will open, so can’t necessarily know when the first bud will open (and not the rest).

MINDFULNESS……

AFRICAN BLUE LILY (Agapanthus) – 28th December, 2012 – in a blissfully cool shady location, Royal Botanic Gardens, Melbourne.

Karl Duffy on his Mindfulbalance blog has the most beautiful quote this morning and I couldn’t resist sharing……

Not being tied to our urgent to-do lists:

Consider the lilies of the field…

And you — what of your rushed and

useful life? Imagine setting it all down —

papers, plans, appointments, everything,

leaving only a note: “Gone to the fields

to be lovely. Be back when I’m through

with blooming.

Lynn Ungar, Camas Lilies

I find his daily quotes and words of wisdom very uplifting and inspiring.  If you have the time and interest, his blog is well worth following.

His email notification of a new blog post is one of the first I view after opening my computer in the morning.

TREE or SHRUBBY GERMANDER (Teucrium fruticans)

Shrubby  Germander (Teucrium fruticans), also known as Tree germander is a bushy, evergreen shrub with oval to lance-shaped, grey-green leaves, to 3/4″ long, with white-woolly underneath.

It’s native to the western and central areas of the Mediterraneun, not Australia, but I find it a lovely plant and almost wish I had one in my balcony garden, although it does like a bit of shelter and I fear it would quickly go downhill in my windy home location.  But with all the successes I’ve had in my small west-facing garden, you never know – it might just grow beautifully 🙂

The whorls of pale blue/mauve flowers are very pretty (even if they don’t have the brilliant colour of some of the flowers in my previous post).

They make an excellent hedge, and do best in moist, well-drained soil and full sun.  They make a nice clipped low hedge in a herb garden and may be cut to within 2″ of ground level in the Spring to maintain a nice compact growth habit.

The images in this post were not made in the Royal Botanic Gardens, (surprise, surprise), but against a wall in the riverside walking path near the Collingwood Children’s Garden in the inner Melbourne north-east suburb of Abbotsford,  where I lived briefly before moving to the western suburb where I currently reside.

BLUE DAISY, BLUE MARGUERITE, KINGFISHER DAISY (Felicia)

This blue daisy has to be one of my favourite blue flowers.

It has several Common Names – Blue Daisy, Blue Marguerite, Kingfisher Daisy (Felicia amelloides), but also comes in white, mauve or lilac.  It has masses of pure blue flowers from Summer to Winter and the patch in the image (above & below) is from the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne.

Originally from South Africa, its dazzling display makes it popular for bedding and containers, including hanging baskets.  This is another flower that I’d have in my garden if I had an in-ground one (instead of plastic pots on an apartment balcony).

I say plastic, because most of my ceramic pots got stolen off my balcony fence when I lived near the Royal Botanic Gardens on the south-east side of Melbourne, so now, I just stick to plastic pots (wherever I live).  What hurt the most is that I had just planted them out with Spring seedlings and fresh potting soil which cost a fair bit of money all up.

Felicias are generally treated as short-lived perennials and form substantial bushy plants with a maximum height or spread of 30-50cm (12-20 inches), so I presume the one in the RBG is more than one plant as you can see how far it’s spread in the image above.  The plentiful tiny leaves are grey or mid-green in colour, those of Felicia amen ‘Variegate’ have bright creamy white edges.