WHITE-FACED HERON (Egretta novaehollandiae)

I was out of bed early today as I have to go into the city (of Melbourne) for an appointment.

While I won’t have time for any Street Photography for my B & W Blog, I do want to fit in a few other errands while there (hip pain permitting).  I’m not looking forward to it as the Christmas shopping crowds will be horrendous.

11th JANUARY 2018 – POST CHRISTMAS CROWDS (and still within the summer school holidays in Australia).

Dare I say……I am not a people person at the best of times, let alone in Melbourne’s CBD (Central Business District) the week before Christmas.  I only go into the city centre for the very rare appointment these days as I can’t stand the cloying perfumes and body products people wear, OR the smell of cigarettes………..let alone the crowds and noise.

Sometimes I think I’m allergic to the human race, not just the city centre 😀

To cut a long story short, because I was up a couple of hours early and sitting at my desk drinking my morning coffee, by sheer chance I happened to look up through the lounge window at the fence between the main road footpath and the cliff face (above my computer screen).

I was astonished to see what looked like a Heron standing on the fence (and wouldn’t you know it, I didn’t have the cameras out of their ‘sleeping bags’).

I twisted around in my desk chair and reached for the long telephoto lens & DSLR case, whipped out the camera and tried to steady it, but I was too excited and couldn’t hold the camera still.  I managed to fire off one shot as the Heron lifted off and flew away.

Fortunately, that DSLR and long 150-500mm lens is always set on Shutter Priority (and I wouldn’t have had time to look at, or change, the camera settings anyway).

Unfortunately, the shutter speed was only 1/100 (left over from last night’s playing around photographing House Sparrows at various camera settings) – not fast enough, although I might have scored a good shot if I had more time to check the DSLR settings AND if I’d been standing on my balcony and could have watched the bird flying to the north (not chopped off by my computer, lounge room blinds etc).

A heron standing on a residential fence really was a rare sight and so you will believe me, here’s the shot:

While I’m not good as shooting moving objects, especially birds in flight,  I have occasionally achieved a few good bird-in-flight shots by sheer luck over recent times.

Here’s some more images taken over the last couple of years of the White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae), at various locations around Melbourne, so new followers know which bird I’m talking about.

……..and at Melbourne Zoo’s Great Aviary (below)

THIS MIGHT HAVE BEEN MID-WINTER WHEN MOST OF THE LARGE BIRDS ARE AT THE TOP OF THE ENORMOUS WALK-THROUGH AVIARY. PROBABLY ABOUT 30-40 FEET ABOVE THE BOARDWALK.
A RATHER WET AND BEDRAGGLED WHITE-FACE HERON SITTING ON A BRANCH – LEVEL WITH THE VISITOR BOARDWALK.

The image (below) is probably the first good shot I ever made of this Heron (along the Yarra River in Abbotsford – an inner suburb north-east of Melbourne city).

WHITE-FACED HERON (Egretta novaehollandiae)

……and down at Jawbone Conservation Reserve in the western coastal suburb of Williamstown.

……..and just in case I manage to get down to the coastal path in Jawbone Conservation Reserve this Summer (before my hip replacement surgery booked in February), here’s a sample of what I hope to see again.

Has to be a cool day though.  I’m not fond of Melbourne’s Summer heat & humidity and this coastal walk has almost no trees or shelter from the scorching Summer sun.

It’s actually only about 25 minutes drive from my home, but without a car, it can be a long 2 bus trip (if I just miss the first bus and have to wait 40 minutes for the next one OR just miss the connecting 2nd bus which also runs on an irregular basis.  Time it right on a weekday and the trip might be about 45-60 minutes?? via public transport).  I could catch a 3rd bus to the other end of this walking trail and walk from north-west to south-east.

 

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