AUSTRALIAN PELICAN (Pelecanus conspicillatus)

You could never miss identifying an Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus).

They’re enormous.

Australian Pelican (Pelecanus conspicillatus)

….and they’re found all over the country except inland to the west.

They have a short tail, very bulky-bodied appearance with a long neck and stout short legs.   The head, neck and body are all-white.

The adult has a short rough crest.  The wings are long and broad, white, with flight feathers producing a broad black trailing edge above and below.

The immature is dark brown and off-white.  While the image below is a wee bit over-exposed, it’s the only photo I have of a young Pelican so it belongs in this post.

It soars frequently and is one of the very few birds I’ve ever captured in flight.  They were probably standing still in the air held aloft by wind gusts LOL 😀

I suppose I am exaggerating as I have photographed the odd bird mid-flight, but its more through luck, than skill with the camera.  Methinks not enough practice (when it’s so much easier to photograph birds that stand still for me).

The best photos I’ve got in my bird library were made at Melbourne Zoo, where, if you know the right winding path through some thickets below the tree-top Orangutan enclosure, you can get very close indeed.

 

It’s such a thrill to get up close to these magnificent birds.

Australian Pelican

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I’ve photographed quite a few down at Brighton beach (a southern bayside beach from Melbourne City – accessible via public transport from the city), but now I live in the west, a little too far away from my present home location to re-visit at the present time.

The other images I’ve made were at Jawbone Conservation Reserve and Marine Sanctuary in the western bay suburb of Williamstown.  I’ve been there via bus (and taxi 🙂 ) a few times now, but still haven’t got around to taking the heavy telephoto lens down there to capture the birds perched on the islands or marshland stretches.  The first 3 images below were captured through a wooden hide, so if I’d had the long lens, I would have been able to capture them up close (as I did at Melbourne Zoo).

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