SILVEREYE (Zosterops lateralis chloronotus)

Back to the archives………22nd February, 2011

I don’t think I’ve shared this image of a Silvereye before.  It’s the only photo of this bird I’ve got and I had to over-edit it to make the bird more visible.

SILVEREYE

Made just after I bought my first Canon DSLR camera and probably taken in the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne, as, at that time, I lived 5 minutes walk from the south-eastern gate.

The plumage varies considerably depending on whether it’s habitat is western Australia or down the south-eastern side of the country.  The plumage of the bird in the photo belongs to  the western race and yet I live in a south-eastern state.  Despite its variable colouring, it is still readily identifiable as Australia’s only small grey and olive-green bird with a bold white eye-ring.

When the berries were ripe on the enormous tree outside my lounge window (of the apartment I lived in at that time), there’d be literally dozens of these cute birds feeding and hopping from branch to branch.  I was never able to capture them in a photo due to the deep, dark foliage and the fact I was facing into the sun (from my vantage point on the building’s side path).

It took me a couple of years before I was able to identify these birds due to the deep shade of the tree.

Here’s a cropped version of the image, so you can see the bird a wee bit better.

SILVEREYE 

 

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14 thoughts on “SILVEREYE (Zosterops lateralis chloronotus)

  1. These look very similar to the South African Cape White-eye, of which several visit my garden regularly yet they flit about so quickly that I agree they are difficult to photograph.

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    1. I find any moving birds tricky, Anne.
      I’m too slow thinking (mainly because I’ve trained myself to move and think slowly……seriously) 🙂

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  2. Great catch! We have some very hard to photograph birds like yours. There are some really tiny ones called Kinglets. They are constantly jumping around in the willow trees, hidden in the foliage. They’re definitely a challenge!

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    1. I haven’t heard of Kinglets, Gunta.
      I have practiced a lot more since seeing the fairy-wrens on my current balcony garden, but I am much better shooting birds that stand still and pose for me I have to say 🙂

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    1. It’s a little bigger than the Fairy-wrens, Terry, but not by much. I haven’t seen any of these Silvereyes in my current home location.
      They move so quickly too. I doubt if I could capture them in a photo nowadays.

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    1. I couldn’t do without my archives in the last 12 months or so, Tanja.

      Inevitably, with less time walking, they are becoming almost the only reason for blogging on this particular site, but no doubt I’ll find a new way to get around outdoors eventually. I seem to be in a state of limbo at the moment trying to grasp all my newer health challenges, but once the building site settles down, no doubt the birds will be come back to entertain me.

      I can actually hear lots of cheeps in the nearby tree this morning (9.30am), just not visible to the naked eye.

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      1. I have noticed that when I really take time to look at my archives, I can re-live some of my experiences. It is, of course, not exactly the same as the real deal, but it’s amazingly beneficial for my soul. I hope you are having a similar experience, Vicki, until you can get out again as much as you would like!

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    2. Same to me, Tanja.

      What’s interesting is how dark the exposure is on many of those archival images. Now I’m living in a bright light-filled modern apartment, the daylight reveals some need for a little editing to increase the exposure on nearly every shot pre April 2015 (as before that I lived in a very dark apartment due to a large tree and shadow from the double storey house next door).

      Now I only do photo reviewing and editing, (or should I say ‘tweaking’),in the bright morning natural light.

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