BLANKET FLOWER (Gallardia)

One of the main aspects I like about Photography is the option of different lenses, camera settings and styles capturing subjects and background in a variety of ways.  Being extremely short-sighted, I find close-ups and the small details interesting.

After all, I’m an amateur photographer first (and a gardener second).

Actually, I never considered myself a gardener at all until I rented a ground-floor apartment with a balcony near the Royal Botanic Gardens on the south-east side of the city.  It didn’t get much sun, but it was fun playing around with a potted plant or two, growing a few hardy shade-loving herbs and had a lovely (shaded) strip of garden down the side path and a slightly larger space in front of the main entrance of the apartment building.

These images of Blanket flowers are from the Perennial Border in the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne.  Most were made in the early years of my Photography hobby.  If you’re new to flower Photography, do take the time to play around with angles, background and lighting conditions (or time of day).  It really does help you learn to ‘see’ and appreciate Photography as a creative art.

THIS IS ONE IMAGE I NEVER REALLY LIKED, BUT WHEN YOU’RE A NOVICE, YOU DO TEND TO KEEP SOME OF THE ‘DELETERS’ as well as the ‘KEEPERS’ (just to compare and look back on).

Just remember the more photos you take, the more time it takes to review them on your computer, (says she who took 605 photos in one afternoon in March 2012).  First (and only) professional ‘shoot’ I’ve ever done and my computer crashed a couple of days later and I lost the whole folder.  Fortunately, I’d saved 140+ to a disc (for some reason which I can’t remember now).  I didn’t know much about ‘back-ups’ in those days 🙂

14 thoughts on “BLANKET FLOWER (Gallardia)

  1. I’m just getting into Gaillardia, Vicki, but I fear that the name ‘blanket flower’ heralds some kind of garden thug. There’s one called Gaillardia ‘Fanfare’ which is particularly attractive to me.

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  2. You’re spot on about the details. It’s one way a photo helps us see things we might not notice or are too fleeting to catch with the naked eye.

    Living next to a botanical garden sounds wonderful!

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    1. I lived 2 streets away from the 38 hectare Royal Botanic Gardens for about 25 years on/off – literally 5 minutes walk to the eastern entrance gate. I worked over the road from the Gardens for 16 1/2 years and used to walk to work in and around the Botanic Gardens (except in inclement weather). Melbourne’s Royal Botanic Gardens are pure Heaven on Earth for me. So much variety in both flower beds and landscaping. One of the nicest parts is the more informal Australian grasses and Australian tree sections………and…….I think I photographed more birds than you could possibly imagine. (I deleted all those old posts to make room for new posts on this blog) 🙂 I miss it since I had to move to the ‘western’ suburbs.

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  3. Love these images, especially the selective focus, and of course the colours. Just to show it’s impossible to gauge taste, I like best the last image☺
    My brother worked across the road from Adelaide botanical garden for decades and his own garden reflected that.

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    1. Thanks for that. I think the last image could have been done better. Just a slight adjustment in angle and composition. I’ve got a few similar images made with a macro lens that are much better, but it served the purpose in this post.
      Your Brother was very lucky in his work location. I haven’t been to Adelaide for about 45 years, so don’t actually remember what their gardens are like. Probably re-lanscaped and changed to more drought-friendly plants in modern times.

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  4. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading and seeing your photos! I wouldn’t call this amateur photography at all! Stunning colors and displays, I love it.

    I will enjoy seeing more from you.

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