BLUE-FACED HONEYEATER (Entomyzon cyanotis)

The Blue-faced Honeyeater is common in the north and north-east of Australia, but very scare in the south, so it was good to see these lovely birds in Melbourne Zoo’s Great Aviary.

This is one of my favourite bird shots from all the zoo visits I made over the years. I think part of it was the angle of the shot and secondly, I like the blue in the background complementing the honeyeater’s blue head.  As an artist (well, water-colour painter, potter & several other artistic skills, I like the overall colours & composition as much as the subject in photography).

These two honeyeaters landed right in front of me after the aviary staff had put some mealy worms on the wooden post for them at feeding time.

I was too slow zooming out on this shot so the bird’s tail got chopped off, but It was still a treat to be so close to this bird. Most of the feeding trays are close to the boardwalk in the Aviary, so if you’re there at the right time, you can observe the birds closely (and get some nice close-up shots).

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14 Comments on “BLUE-FACED HONEYEATER (Entomyzon cyanotis)

    • Thanks Terry.
      I wish I could share more of them, but as you know Australia is a large place and without a car (and the finances), I can only share the ‘locals’ and from the zoo. I think I was a bit over-zealous in reducing my photo library over the last 18 months as I can’t seem to find many of the zoo shots I thought I’d kept.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I went through my whole photo library for the second time last night and they’re definitely deleted. It doesn’t take long to skim through 2500 images nowadays. I’ve got all the birds filed in their named folders correctly. Out of those 2500, there are about 400 B & W family history images also so that makes it even easier to skim through the remaining 2000+.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I know you’ll love the birds up in the north of Australia, Cindy. Since there’s more rainforest, you should be able to see some of the more exotic species.

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    • These are Melbourne Zoo shots, John. Don’t know whether you’d see them in the wild down here in Melbourne, probably only further north in the state.

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  1. What a gorgeous bird. It’s not just the colors, but the way they’re combined that’s so wonderful. By the way — I accidentally deleted four hundred photos from an SD card this year, and discovered, thanks to a blog friend, that I could get them back. I’d never formatted the card I was using, so I not only got the 400 back, I got 2400 that were on the card! The program can be used to retrieve deleted files from anything, including a PC, as I recall. If you want to give it a try, I’ll send the details.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Linda.

      I use a USB cable to download my images and then delete all shots and format the card straight away.

      Thanks for the offer, but it took me years to get my photo library down to 2500+ and I’m one of those people that believes if I lose something, I’m not meant to have it (if you know what I mean). Took me hundreds, (if not thousands), of hours to delete all the images out of my library to reduce it as I don’t like the way the Mac’s El Capitan photo library software works. I only kept my favourites (which are not necessarily the best technically, just the images I like).

      Now my health is declining it may be that I have to give up walking and photography outdoors altogether one day. Trying to think of a new hobby at the moment, but photography really is the easiest to do with chronic pain (& fatigue).

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