RED-BROWED FINCH (Neochmia temporalis)

I’ve photographed several small birds grazing on seed in recent weeks – mostly late on a sunny afternoon.  I haven’t shared those images because the birds are generally too far away to see much feather detail OR they are poor shots with waving grass spoiling the image (the shots below are examples).

The images below were made with the Sigma 150-500mm lens fully zoomed out to 500mm and I was trying to get a focal point on their eye before they did the next ‘hop’.  Not easy.  Since I can’t see the eye, I have to just aim at the red part of the head which is quite clearly visible.

I spotted about 4-5 of them pecking at seed around one of the trees below the gravel walking path which goes straight down to the river.

Here’s a photo of the field (to the right of the nature reserve as I face the river) that I’m talking about.  The image was made last October so it’s still water-logged from the record-breaking Spring rains we had in 2016.  I was standing on the gravel path on the lower left of the image below and the birds were in the field which is about 6 feet lower than the walking path.   While the birds were only about 25-30 feet from my position, I guess I’d need a 700mm lens to get close enough to get a really good shot to share.

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5 Comments on “RED-BROWED FINCH (Neochmia temporalis)

  1. I’m constantly amazed at the variety of birds you have. There’s no reason I should be. I suppose it’s just that I grew up not knowing anything except the kookaburra. When I thought of Australian birds, that’s what came to mind. These are especially pretty. Any bird with a bright spot of red is great in my book.

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    • There supposed to be 100+ bird species in the nature reserve & park next to my home, Linda, but I have really only seen about 10 since I moved here 7 months ago and they are mainly the common birds seen in most public Parks and Gardens around Melbourne.

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  2. Those red markings are fascinating. They can be seen at quite a distance because they are so intense. I have a problem here getting close enough to most birds for a photo. There is just so much space for them that they don’t need to risk getting close to a person so they keep their distance.

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    • I can appreciate your point with the wide open spaces in your area. I think you’d need a pretty long telephoto lens to photograph birds in the mountains and valleys.

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