FOOTSCRAY PARK

After 6 months of living in the western suburbs of Melbourne, I finally got around to visiting Footscray Park yesterday afternoon.

I had previously dismissed this park as being of minimal interest (when passing by on the bus route).  But yesterday, there were still a few flowers in bloom at this time of Autumn.  It’s not a place I’d go to again, except maybe next Spring.  After all the years of walking around the Royal Botanic Gardens when I lived on the south-east side of Melbourne, most public parks and gardens seem rather ‘ordinary’ in comparison.  Yesterday I could hear lots of bird song along the paths, but apart from Common Mynas hopping about on the lawns, only managed to capture a Little Wattlebird high up in a tree.

I’d rather photograph a wildflower than a cultivated one now.

These days I prefer to go on a Nature Walk (with my camera), somewhere a little more rustic too.

  • Footscray Park is one of the largest and most intact examples of an Edwardian park in Australia. The 15-hectare park is located on the south bank of the Maribyrnong River in Footscray in Victoria. It is classified as a heritage place on the Victorian Heritage Register for its aesthetic, horticultural and social significance to the State of Victoria and was the first gardens to be placed on the register. The park is noted for its botanical collection, ornamental ponds and garden structures.
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5 Comments on “FOOTSCRAY PARK

  1. I enjoyed your wander through Footscray Park, Vicki. Lovely vibrant colours. You are moving towards the drabness of winter and I the lushness of summer.

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    • It was looking surprisingly lush, considering we’ve just gone through summer, but then, we never really had the long weeks of really high temperatures we normally get in late January and March this year. The news said that end of summer in 2017 was the coldest in 65 years.

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    • Thank you, Pete.
      Many of the flowers were finished for the season. Only 3 water lily flowers. That was the only rose left alive on the bush for example, too. Plenty of Japanese Anemones and Plumbago though.

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